Are Women in Prestigious Jobs More Likely to Get Divorced?

Researchers often explore causes of divorce and seek to understand "risk" factors that may indicate whether one type of person is more likely to get divorced than another. For instance, studies have analyzed whether growing up with divorced parents makes a person more likely to get divorced themselves later on their adult lives, or whether having divorced friends makes an individual's chances of filing for divorce more likely. According to a recent article on BBC News, a new study suggests that women who get promoted at work may be more likely to divorce than women who do not. The article suggests that, although gender equality issues are shifting, sociocultural perceptions about and biases concerning gender roles still affect heterosexual relationships. We want to tell you more about the study and to consider its implications for couples in Michigan.

Women With Successful Careers Have More Trouble Finding Lasting Marriages

According to the article, even in the most gender-equal countries, high-powered women struggle more than men to find lasting partnerships. In the U.S. and across much of Western Europe-and even in countries noted for gender equality like Sweden-women were much more likely to experience difficulties in their relationships after experiencing career success than men. In other words, when women experience notable professional success, they tend to have more problems in their marriages than men who experience career success. According to Johanna Rickne, a Stockholm University professor and one of the authors of the recent study, getting to the top in politics and business increases the divorce rate of women but not of men.

The study analyzed data from heterosexual married couples who worked for large private companies. The married couples in the study had varying characteristics-some of the couples included a wife with a successful career and a husband with a less notable career, while other couples in the study featured a husband with a successful career and a wife with either a less successful career or a wife who played the role of a stay-at-home parent. Through the study, the researchers determined that married women were twice as likely to divorce their partners three years after their promotion to CEO than their male counterparts.

Even women in notable public careers faced similar odds. For example, married women who ran for public office and won doubled the likelihood that they would split from their partners. The study did not show a similar effect for men who ran for public office and won, or who won a reelection campaign. The data holds true for careers beyond business and politics, such as doctors, police officers, and members of the clergy. The study was published in the American Economic Journal.

Contact a Michigan Divorce Lawyer for More Information

The study suggests that the same patterns likely would hold for married couples in Michigan. If you have questions about divorce or if you want to start the process of filing, an experienced Michigan divorce lawyer can help. Contact the Law Offices of Michael A. Robbins today to get started.