Managing Summer Vacations With Kids After Divorce

When you file for divorce in Michigan and have children from the marriage, you should be prepared to learn more about Michigan parenting time guidelines and the ways in which the court will deal with child custody. Generally speaking, the courts recognize that both parents should play a role in their child's upbringing unless there is a good reason for the child to spend most of his or her time with only one parent. While shared parenting time is often beneficial for the parent-child relationship, sharing time over the summer can be more frustrating for parents.

When kids are out of school on summer break, shared parenting time can make vacation planning especially difficult. How can parents deal with summer vacation frustrations after divorce?

Create a Parenting Time Schedule That Meets Your Needs

One of the best ways to handle vacation times after divorce with kids, especially the long break over the summer, is to work with the other parent on a parenting time schedule that meets both of your needs (and the child's needs). For example, you might plan for Parent A to have time with the child up until the middle of the summer, while Parent B will have time with the child for the second half of the summer. This type of schedule can allow the parents to have some flexibility when it comes to planning a summer vacation while also allowing both parents to know ahead of time when not to plan a vacation with the child.

Parenting time schedules can also stay the same over summer breaks as during the school year. For example, Parent A might have time with the child every other week, while Parent B has time with the child on the alternating weeks. Even keeping this type of schedule can allow parents to plan ahead for summer vacations, although it allows less flexibility when it comes to purchasing plane tickets and booking hotel deals.

Preparing Yourself for Time Without Your Child

In addition to the difficulties of planning a flexible summer vacation with your child when there is a parenting time schedule in place, summer break can also be emotionally difficult on the parents when they are without the child for weeks at a time. For instance, in the parenting time schedule we mentioned above in which the parents split the summer in half, one parent will be without the child for an extended period of time at any given point. This can be emotionally difficult for one or both of the parents when they are used to seeing the child at least once every other week and often more frequently.

According to an article in Divorce Magazine, this is a common issue for parents, especially during the first summer after a divorce. The article recommends that the parents each prepare themselves for spending time without the child by making plans for themselves. When you are busy doing an activity you love or taking your own vacation, it will usually not be as difficult to spend time away from your child.

Contact a Divorce Attorney in Michigan

If you have questions about parenting time schedules after divorce this summer, a divorce lawyer in Michigan can assist you. Contact the Law Offices of Michael A. Robbins for more information about the services we provide.